Subatomic Particle Simulator now on GitHub!

Well, I have just spent an entire weekend using Windows, amounting to probably more hours than I had spent with this operating system in the previous six months! Of course, this meant that I had to endure loads of automatic updates, their drain on bandwidth and automatic restarts! It was worth it though to get the Subatomic Particle Simulator up, working just as well as it does on GNU/Linux! It’s nice to know that I’ve made this thing cross-platform.

More good news: In the process of porting the code, I realised that the best thing to do was to fork the Source SDK repository on GitHub, and that way avoid all the problems of contaminating a working copy to compile the simulator. It is here, so you can now clone it in a ready-to-compile state, or even download a ZIP file if you would prefer.

Again, same legal restrictions apply – due to incompatible licences, it is not currently possible to (legally) distribute binaries. Once again, I apologise for this, and hope I can sort it out in the future.

PS. If you would like to express your opinions on how legal restrictions like this should apply in the future, please go to this new campaign website.

Release of Source Code of Subatomic Particle Visualiser

Well, this is kind of embarrassing. In October, I implemented the GNU Scientific Library as part of the science project I mentioned in the previous post. Since I was working towards an actual deadline, I guess I was too hurried to thoroughly check what licence the GSL uses. Apparently, I assumed it was licensed under the LGPL, which many GNU libraries tend to be. However, it is actually under the much more restrictive GPL, which forbids me from distributing it combined with any proprietary programme. The code given by the Source SDK for the server DLL (the only thing I actually modified) counts as proprietary, since it is distributed under a licence that forbids selling. Therefore, while experimenting with the two pieces of software together is fine, if I were to distribute my compiled server library, I would be in breach of the GPL.

Therefore, the long and the short of it is that my only option is to distribute my code and the GNU Scientific Library on their own, and let you, the user, actually compile it. To that end, here is an archive containing my code plus the GSL code, in a directory structure that will let it fit right into a fresh download of the Source SDK, plus instructions for getting it up and running:
http://www.vigovproductions.net/simsource.tar.gz
It is currently designed to compile only on GNU/Linux. A Windows version will be made in the coming days.

Here is a game directory to put in your SteamApps/SourceMods folder:
http://www.vigovproductions.net/simulator_mod.tar.gz
Once you put it there, don’t forget that you need to add in a bin folder, with the libraries compiled from the source code. They can be found in “sp/game/mod_episodic/bin” and “sp/game/vigov_simulator/bin”, under the Source SDK directory structure.

I apologise for not being able to release a compiled game. In order to do so, I would need to either pick a different game engine or a different mathematical library (or write the code myself…). I may do one of those in the future.

My return to the blogosphere

The time has come for me to return to this blog and explain my absence for the last few months. I was spending a lot of time working on a project for a prestigious science and technology exhibition. As such, between that and school work, I had basically no time to blog, or upload anything more than trivial logo videos to my YouTube channel.
Well, the project is now “finished”, and a selection of the fruits of my labour has been uploaded to YouTube.

The files for this game/tool will be uploaded to this site in a few days’ time, when I have had a chance to sort through them.

Here are some of the things I could have mentioned had I been actively blogging:

  • The change in Saorview frequencies, and how it left everyone with eight extra dud channels in their EPG.
  • The introduction of RTÉ One HD, and the stretching of classic programmes that came therewith.
  • The court cases involving the NSA.
  • Halloween
  • Christmas
  • The New Year

So what’s on the cards now? Well, apart from school, there’s:

  • Sony Pictures Television History Mark IV – I know, when does it stop, right? Well, significant info has been discovered since Mark III was made. Hopefully I can reuse lots of animation from previous videos – the thought of starting from scratch really doesn’t appeal to me!
  • Updates to the spreadsheet-based corporate timelines published on this site.
  • That new Aperture Ireland release I promised but never delivered. Speaking of which, I wonder if Valve will ever get around to porting Portal 2 to GNU/Linux…